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Manager's Corner™: Stop Doing One Thing!

by Admin 10. December 2014 10:28


by Liz Weber, CMC, CSP

I've been reflecting on a recent conversation with a client. The conversation was similar to two previous conversations we've had concerning inaction by his managers. However, this time, without planning to say it, I simply said, "We've discussed this same problem three times now. When are you going to stop doing what your managers can and should be doing for themselves?" Needless to say, it got very quiet on his end of the phone for awhile. However, after about one minute of silence, my client said, "I keep doing exactly what I've told you I need to stop doing don't I?" Yep.

 

My client is a smart man. He's built a multi-million dollar company. He's created a solid company reputation, a loyal client base, and a team of employees who want to help his company become even more successful. Yet by repeating just a few behaviors, he keeps holding his managers, their teams, and his company back from becoming an even stronger organization. He continues to feed his team's inaction. So as I shared with him, I'll share with you: If you want to do things differently going forward, stop doing them incorrectly now.

 

If you want to do things differently going forward, stop doing them incorrectly now.

 

Like most managers, you're probably already overwhelmed with too many things to do in too short of a timeframe with too many requirements imposed upon you. The last thing you want is one more thing to do. So don't take on anything new. Instead, stop doing one thing you currently do that's not really helping you, your team members or your customers.

 

Stop doing one thing you currently do that's not really helping you, your team members or your customers.

 

If you're like me and most of my clients, you won't even have to think too hard about potential things to stop. We all have things we can improve upon, and we all already know what we should stop doing to help ourselves, our teams, and our organizations.  Here are a few items I've discussed with clients over the past several months. See if any resonate with you:

 

  • Stop thinking you need to be involved in everything in order for things to get done right.
  • Stop obsessing over tasks no one else cares about other than you.
  • Stop pursuing the bright, shiny distractions that sound interesting and seem to be "sure fire solutions" but only take you off-track and waste your time and money. 
  • Stop involving yourself in projects your staff could and should be doing themselves.
  • Stop providing feedback only when it's to criticize.
  • Stop claiming you hold yourself and your employees accountable when all you do is give them assignments, ask how they're coming along, and then...nothing else.
  • Stop changing directions after each Sales, Production, or Leadership conference you attend or book you read.
  • Stop resenting the team you've hired and trained.
  • Stop rationalizing your own scattered leadership style.
  • Stop rationalizing poor team member behavior.
  • Stop rationalizing why you've retained underperforming team members.
  • Stop making excuses for not doing what you know you need to do to make your organization more successful.
  • Stop running from making the big changes in your own behavior before you expect others to change.

 

You're already over-loaded, so don't take on one more responsibility. Instead stop doing one thing, and watch how by not doing that one thing any longer, you help yourself, your team, and your organization.

 

Copyright MMXIV - Liz Weber, CMC, CSP* - Weber Business Services, LLC – www.WBSLLC.com

* Liz is one of only 13 people in the U.S. to hold both the Certified Speaking Professional (CSP) and Certified Management Consultant (CMC) designations; the highest earned designations in two different professions.

 

 

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Manager's Corner™: When You Raise The Bar, Your Team Will Trip Over It

by Admin 27. October 2014 08:13

by Liz Weber, CMC, CSP

 

I feel bad for a few of my clients. They're at that point in our leadership training and coaching projects where they're actually doing  what they should have been doing for years. And it's not easy.

Changing behaviors and implementing new policies, new personnel actions, and new initiatives is difficult. In addition, changing behaviors that have been learned and honed over 5, 10, 20 or more years takes time. It rarely happens right away or on the first attempt. It takes practice to refine and correctly implement the correct new behavior at the right time and in the right way. And, when attempted, the new behaviors are often not implemented well many times before they're finally implemented well on a consistent basis. Changing behaviors often takes months, if not years.

So, with all of the failed attempts, missteps, and just plain old screw-ups, it's easy to see why so often clients will say things such as, "Things are worse now than ever before!" "People are anxious and uncomfortable."  "I'm afraid to say anything to anyone!"  Every one of those statements is understandable...and desired.

Wait. What?  Why are they desired?  Why am I not asking myself: How could our training have gone so terribly wrong? When clients make comments such as the above, it's an indication the process IS working. When things feel worse than before because of actions being taken, the client's leadership team is changing and progressing.  Members of the leadership team are finally doing what they should have been doing for years. However, because many of them are doing things at the same time, it's shaking things up with more visibility and speed than if just one manager were to make changes on his or her own.  And the entire organization feels it.

When leaders and team members intentionally think about and change their behavior and performance, they often go through a process similar to cleaning out the garage or a closet. Things get messy before they get organized. The leaders and team members have got to pull everything out. They've got to assess their inventory of behaviors. Determine which to keep, which to eliminate, and which to strengthen. Then they have to put the remaining skills back together in a way that makes sense for them and works in the right way at the right time within the organization.  It's not easy.  However, change rarely is.

When people and organizations start to implement behaviors and expectations to improve communication, clarify expectations, and hold everyone (top to bottom) accountable, the leadership team is essentially raising the bar for performance. However, when leaders raise the performance bar from where it's always been to where it needs to be, people will trip over it. Many are not used to having to think about clearing the performance bar day-in-and-day-out.  They've been sauntering over it for years. So now that the expectations for everyone have been raised, there will be stumbles. There will be missteps. There will be leaders and team members who fall flat on their faces. If you're lucky, there will be many who trip. Because when they trip, they'll pay attention a bit more and learn how to clear the bar smoothly the next time.

Copyright MMXIV - Liz Weber, CMC, CSP* - Weber Business Services, LLC – www.WBSLLC.com

* Liz is one of only 13 people in the U.S. to hold both the Certified Speaking Professional (CSP) and Certified Management Consultant (CMC) designations; the highest earned designations in two different professions.

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Manager's Corner™: When Leadership Pretends Not to See

by Admin 23. April 2014 07:36

"How can I let the leadership team know my manager is a really poor manager and our team is falling apart because of him?"

That question was emailed to me by one frustrated senior manager. It is such a tragedy because here's the truly frustrating aspect of this situation:

The leadership team already knows this manager is weak. They've simply chosen not to do anything about it.

The leadership team is simply pretending not to see this manager's weaknesses. Because if they do, they'll have to address them.  If they address this manager's weak management skills, they may well have to address their own management failures in letting this manager become so ineffective. Now why would they want to open that can of worms?

I've yet to hear a CEO, president, executive director, or Vice President say, "So-and-so is a weak manager? Really? I had no idea!"  More often than not they say, "Yeah, I know, but he really knows Production. Until we can find someone with those skills, we're kind of stuck."

That's a logical-sounding excuse, but I don't buy it. If the leadership team is keeping a poor manager in place because she or he has technical skills, they've got more systemic issues to address than the manager's weak management skills:
  • They're not building depth in the organization.
    • Why does only one person have the technical expertise needed to effectively oversee and manage production (or whatever the department is)? 
      • Who is this manager's backup?  What happens if s/he is on vacation, leaves the company, or retires?
    • What is being done to continually develop the skills of all employees to ensure they can continue to support the company as it moves forward to support its customers?
  • They're promoting the wrong people into management positions.
    • Why is the manager the one with the strongest technical skills?
      • The people doing the work - the people who are the closest to it - should be the strongest technically.
    • Technical skills and management skills are two very different skill sets.
      • Don't promote a strong technical person only to create a weak manager.
  • They're teaching the weak manager to continue to behave poorly by enabling his or her behavior. By not addressing poor management skills, they're condoning them.
  • They're allowing a weak manager to frustrate solid, well-intentioned employees.  As a result, employees who had every intention of contributing, don't. 

If you're a leader, ask yourself, "What have I been pretending not to see?"  The longer you choose not to address issues with your own leadership, your senior team's leadership, or with your management team, the longer you'll cause your employees to sit-back and disengage. So before you allow anyone on your leadership team to complain about production, operations, marketing, or any other department, group of employees, or individual employee, ask yourself: "What have I seen but chose to ignore?"  Then, take your blinders off and do your job.

Copyright MMXIV - Liz Weber, CMC, CSP* - Weber Business Services, LLC – www.WBSLLC.com

* Liz is one of only 12 people in the U.S. to hold both the Certified Speaking Professional (CSP) and Certified Management Consultant (CMC) designations; the highest earned designations in two different professions.

 

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Business

2014-2015 Washington County Teacher of the Year Finalists Named

by Admin 27. March 2014 04:59
Finalists for the 2014-2015 Teacher of the Year have been announced by Washington County Public Schools (WCPS). Each of the five finalists will be reviewed by a judging committee, including interviews and classroom observations. The Teacher of the Year will be announced and honored at the annual dinner and recognition on April 23, 2014, at Fountain Head Country Club in Hagerstown. The program is sponsored by the Hagerstown/Washington County Chamber of Commerce Foundation. Here are the finalists:
  • Carolyn Holcomb – Western Heights Middle School – 7th and 8th grade merit science teacher – Carolyn has taught for twelve years, two of those for WCPS. She has been a guest speaker at professional development seminars and workshops and a Honeywell scholarship recipient for NASA Space Camp. Outside of school, Carolyn has limited her community activities to a church bereavement group so she can focus more time on her students’ needs. Before arriving in Washington County, she had been involved in the Red Cross, crisis pregnancy counseling, church and youth activities. Carolyn says, “I have to convince my students from day one that I offer them something that will allow them to accomplish their goals, and my planning focuses all year on keeping them engaged and learning.”
  • Sally Irwin – Washington County Technical High School – Project Lead the Way Biomedical Science teacher – Sally has taught for ten years in Washington County. She has been a Teacher of the Year finalist for three consecutive years and has received nominations the past five years. Sally’s program was nominated for the 2014 American School Board Journal Magna Award and received honors from the Maryland State Department of Education for Outstanding Career and Technology Program in 2011. She is a frequent guest speaker at elementary and middle school STEM (science, technology, engineering, math) nights and has been part of biomedical science presentations at the state and university level. Aside from activities in her field, Sally was a member of the North Hagerstown High School athletic boosters from 2009 – 2013. Sally says, “The project-based learning approach in my classroom allows students to make real-world connections to the biomedical field. I love to see their spark for biomedical science grow.”
  • Courtney Leard – Fountaindale Elementary School – 2nd grade teacher – Courtney has taught for twelve years, five of those for WCPS. She was a 2013 recipient of Governor O’Malley’s Explore and Restore Your Schoolshed Rehabilitation grant, received honorable mention for the Presidential Innovation Award for Environmental Educators in 2013 and has been a recipient of the Boeing Educator in Space, Space Camp grant. Courtney’s community involvement includes volunteer work for her church and the Antietam Watershed Alliance, along with contributions to her undergraduate alma mater, Mary Baldwin College, in the areas of admissions and student recruitment. Courtney says, “I maintain a vibrant, respectful, student-centered learning environment in which much is expected of my students, and where success continues to build every day.”
  • Gretchen Smith – North High Hagerstown High School – Social studies teacher – Gretchen has worked for WCPS for 16 years. She is a past finalist for Teacher of the Year and is active in Delta Kappa Gamma Society International, which promotes professional and personal  growth in women educators and excellence in education. Her community activity has been focused on various roles at the Hancock Methodist Church. Gretchen says, “I want all my students to enter a warm environment of respect where they feel safe to take risks and learn the craft of the historian through reading, writing, role-playing, cooperative learning and technology.”
  • Ashley Wisner – Boonsboro High School – Social studies teacher – Ashley has taught five years for WCPS and received her National Board Certification in Social Studies in 2013. She has served as coach of Boonsboro High’s We the People team for the past four years, leading them to district championships each year and state runner-up finishes three of those years.  Ashley’s activities outside of school include ongoing work on behalf of the Frostburg University Alumni Association, contributions to homecoming and other school/community events in Boonsboro, and the coordination of efforts and resources to raise awareness and support a student critically injured in a car accident in 2011. Ashley says, “I provide a learning environment that is rich in student-to-student interaction, lively class discussion and debate, and filled with passion for learning and content knowledge.”

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Manager's Corner™: How Organized is Your Leadership?

by Admin 20. March 2014 09:47


by Liz Weber, CMC, CSP

How often have you walked into a bricks and mortar business and been completely disappointed? The products were not displayed logically or conveniently. The physical building, parking lot, and retail space were not well-lit and were noticably dirty. The staff didn't interact seamlessly - if at all - to help you. The entire experience made you want to leave as soon as possible - never to return.

On the flip side, how often have you been noticeably impressed with a business' product displays, physical cleanliness, and obvious customer and team focus? I'm hoping you've experienced more of the latter than the former. But more importantly, I'm hoping your business didn't pop into another reader's mind as s/he was visualizing examples of less-than-impressive businesses.

How people view your business is a reflection of your leadership

Whether we're talking bricks-and-mortar businesses, retail operations, service firms, or pure web-based businesses, your company's organization is a reflection of your leadership - or lack of it.

  • When your team members lack basic customer service skills, it's a reflection of your leadership.
  • When your team members are not prepared for client meetings, it's a reflection of your leadership.
  • When your team members don't present a positive image of you or your business to your customers, it's a reflection of your leadership.
  • When your physical business structure is disorganized and ill-kept, it's a reflection of your leadership.
  • When your on-line presence is disorganized and not up-to-date, it's a reflection of your leadership.
  • When your team members are frustrated, unmotivated, and underperforming, it's a reflection of your leadership.
  • When your business has a limited repeat customer ratio, it's a reflection of your leadership.

 

Do your job and clean-up your business.

When your time is spent correcting mistakes and apologizing to customers, your success is limited. So, do what you need to do: clean-up your business by cleaning up your leadership.

1.    Identify opportunities to improve - Pick just one item that is causing customers frustration, and fix it. Once this one item starts to get traction with the team, identify another problem and fix it.

2.    Communicate the new expectations of your team AND yourself - Don't expect the team to change if you don't.

3.    Focus on your customer instead of doing tasks - Don't allow yourself to become so busy being busy you forget your customers. Monitor what your customers are experiencing.  Are your team's interactions with them reflecting your business (and your leadership) positively or negatively? Are the customers' experiences easy or are they painful?

 

As the saying goes, "Disorder is disadvantage." If you want an advantage in business, organize your leadership.

Copyright MMXIV - Liz Weber, CMC, CSP* - Weber Business Services, LLC – www.WBSLLC.com

* Liz is one of only 12 people in the U.S. to hold both the Certified Speaking Professional (CSP) and Certified Management Consultant (CMC) designations; the highest earned designations in two different professions.

 

 

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Let’s Move Washington County Business Forward

by Admin 29. January 2014 07:35

 

It’s a New Year and we want to help your business reach for new opportunities. Washington County Department of Business Development and our partners provide a number of services to assist in the retention and expansion of Washington County’s business community.  No question or request is too big or small --we want our local business leaders to know staff is ready to support your needs. Need help navigating incentives, infrastructure or permitting? Give us a call and let DBD staff guide you through County services.

 

If it’s media coverage you’re looking for, contact our Department of Public Relations and Community affairs. From press release drafting through distribution and outreach, our staff are committed to helping you share the good news. Have a new product launch, current promotion or a local team sponsorship? Let us help you get the word out.  Through our membership with PRWeb, you can amplify the reach of your announcements. PRWeb gets your news distributed to every major news site and search engine on the web and in front of consumers and journalists.

 

For businesses interested in Washington County Department of Business Development information and resources, contact us on Facebook at Washington County, Maryland Department of Business Development and Twitter at @WashCoBizDev, email at edcinfo@hagerstownedc.org or call: 240-313-2280

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Update on Retirement Plans and Same-Sex Marriages

by Admin 14. October 2013 11:53

In our July blog post, Retirement Plans and Same-Sex Marriages, we discussed the Supreme Court’s ruling that made the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) unconstitutional.  At that time, we indicated that we were waiting for future guidance with respect to many issues.  We have received guidance on the important issue of whether a same-sex marriage is defined by the location of the marriage celebration, current domicile of the couple or the location of the employer.

 

As we indicated in July, DOMA stated that the word “marriage” means only a legal union between one man and one woman as husband and wife, and the word “spouse” refers only to a person of the opposite sex who is a husband or wife.  As DOMA has been determined to be unconstitutional, tax-qualified retirement plans must now treat the relationship of same-sex married couples as a marriage and each party to that marriage as a spouse in order to maintain the plans’ tax-qualified status.

 

In Revenue Ruling 2013-17, we received guidance with respect to whether the definition of a marriage is based on the place of the marriage celebration, place of the couple’s domicile or their place of employment.  Each department within the federal government has developed their own definition with respect to this issue.  Luckily, the Internal Revenue Service, Department of Treasury and Department of Labor which are the agencies regulating tax-qualified retirement plans have adopted the same definition of marriage.  These agencies have determined that a marriage is based on the location of the marriage celebration.  Therefore, if the state or country where a marriage occurs issues same-sex marriage licenses, the status of that marriage for retirement plan purposes will not change if the couple relocates to a location that does not issue same-sex marriage licenses.

 

We still await future guidance from regulatory agencies:

 

-          The effective date of the new ruling with respect to tax-qualified retirement plans.  In other words, will the Supreme Court ruling have a retroactive impact?

-          Plan amendment requirements that will address the definition of a participant’s spouse.

 

As a reminder, there are several retirement plan operational issues that impact a participant’s spouse.  Processes must be developed to address the following issues that may be applicable to your plan.

 

-          Survivor benefits for plans that provide a qualified joint and survivor form of payment.

-          Waiver of death benefits that are automatically provided to a participant’s spouse.

-          Rollover of death benefits by a participant’s spouse.

-          Hardship distributions used to pay for a spouse’s medical, tuition or funeral expenses.

-          The ability of a participant’s spouse to defer the payment of death benefits.

-          Entitlement to benefits as the result of a Qualified Domestic Relations Order (QDRO).

-          Spousal consents for loans and distributions.

 

We will keep you informed as we receive future guidance with respect to the impact of same-sex marriages on tax-qualified retirement plans. 

For more solutions and insights to help better manage your employees and business, check out our Human Capitalizing blog at http://blog.cbiz.com or follow CBIZ Retirement Plans on Twitter --@CBIZ_Retirement.

 

Article written by Bill Karbon, Director of Compliance for CBIZ Retirement Plan Services. He can be reached via wkarbon@cbiz.com.

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Washington County Emergency Management to Host Community Emergency Response Training

by Admin 18. September 2013 05:26

Hagerstown, Md. (September 17, 2013) – Washington County Emergency Management invites the surrounding community to register for the free Community Emergency Response Training (CERT) program being held September 27-28, 2013, at the Washington County Division of Emergency Services Building, 16232 Elliott Parkway, Williamsport, Md.

 

The lecture portion of training held September 27 from 6-9 p.m. will cover eight modules including: 

·         Disaster Preparedness 

·         Fire Suppression

·         Medical Operations I and II

·         Light Search and Rescue

·         Psychology 

·         Animals in Disaster

·         Terrorism Awareness

 

 

The September 28 class held 8:30 a.m. – 3:00 p.m. will incorporate hands-on activities that bring to life each of the lecture modules. Class attendees will practice light search and rescue techniques, execute treatment strategies for victims and properly extinguish a live fire.  

Both lecture and hands-on classes are required to complete the course and a certificate will be issued upon completion. Trained citizens can often supplement response capability in the event of a disaster.

Following completion of the course, individuals will be better prepared to respond to the aftermath of a disaster

To register, contact Verna Brown at 240-313-4364 or vbrown@washco-md.net.

 

For additional information, contact Public Relations and Community Affairs Manager James Jenkins at 240-313-2384 

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Do You Need a Business Coach?

by Admin 5. September 2013 11:17


According to an American Management Association survey, there are several key services that speak to the business community about surviving a slow economy better than others. One of those services is business coaching.  A business coach is a person who wants to help business leaders and businesses succeed. A business coach knows this passion and desire to help is essential in building a sense of trust and partnership with a business leader.

A business coach oftentimes takes on the role of a mentor and helps a business leader or owner formulate a Vision and Strategic Plan to set the expectations for the business to profitably succeed. A business coach can assist with developing employee incentive and benefit programs that can minimize employee turnover and reduce operating costs. A business coach can work with the individual business owner to develop a set of Income, Lifestyle, Wealth and Equity (ILWE) goals to achieve through his business or potential business. The most important job of the business coach is then holding the business owner or leader accountable for attaining those goals mentioned above. This will require having an honest conversation with the business owner or leader in a caring, thoughtful manner –these conversations are called "carefrontations;" but if the trust is built, it becomes less difficult.

Business leaders and owners today are looking for leadership, relationship and opportunity. Business coaches follow well-established discovery processes that will help you, the business owner or leader, have increased confidence in a business coach’s ability to relate to their situation and help them make progress.

Over the next several months, you will be presented with a series of articles in which I discuss “8 Reasons Why You Need a Business Coach”; “The Role of the Business Coach”; and lastly, “Why You Should Get a Business Coach”!

Remember, if running a business were easy, then everybody would be doing it! Creating the right game plan for success and profitability is challenging, requires hard work, and requires putting the right team together - a business coach can help you create and develop that winning team!

Submitted by Jeff Rock

jeffrock60@yahoo.com

Jeff Rock Consulting, LLC

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Retirement Plans and Same-Sex Marriages

by Admin 16. July 2013 04:41

 

As has been widely addressed in the news, on June 26, 2013 the Supreme Court ruled that the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) is unconstitutional.  The Court’s decision is far reaching and has a significant impact on the operation of tax-qualified retirement plans. We are writing to alert you of the issues resulting from the decision.

DOMA stated that the word “marriage” means only a legal union between one man and one woman as husband and wife, and the word “spouse” refers only to a person of the opposite sex who is a husband or wife.  As DOMA has been determined to be unconstitutional , tax-qualified retirement plans must now treat the relationship of same-sex married couples as a marriage and each party to that marriage as a spouse  in order to maintain the plans’ tax-qualified status.

As the states do not have uniform rules regarding same-sex marriages, the Internal Revenue Service and Department of Labor will look to applicable state law to determine the marital status of individuals.  Currently, 12 states and the District of Columbia issue same-sex marriage licenses.

The following are issues requiring future guidance from regulatory agencies:

 

-          The status of same-sex marriages where the couple moves to a state that does not issue same-sex marriage licenses

-          The treatment of plan sponsors with employees in more than one state

-          The effective date of the new ruling with respect to tax-qualified retirement plans.

-          Plan amendment requirements that will address the definition of a participant’s spouse.

 

There are several operational issues that impact a participant’s spouse.  Among the issues that are impacted by this ruling are:

 

-          Survivor benefits for plans that provide a qualified joint and survivor form of payment.

-          Waiver of death benefits that are automatically provided to a participant’s spouse.

-          Rollover of death benefits by a participant’s spouse.

-          Hardship distributions used to pay for a spouse’s medical, tuition, or funeral expenses.

-          The ability of a participant’s spouse to defer the payment of death benefits.

-          Entitlement to benefits as the result of a Qualified Domestic Relations Order (QDRO).

-          Spousal consents for loans and distributions.

 

In order to prepare for the new requirements brought about by the Supreme Court decision, we suggest that plan sponsors develop a process to gather same-sex marriage information (if not currently done).

Stay tuned for updates as future guidance is provided with this far reaching Supreme Court decision. 

For more solutions and insights to help better manage your employees and business, check out Human Capitalizing at http://blog.cbiz.com or follow CBIZ Retirement Plans on Twitter-@CBIZ_Retirement.

 

Article submitted by Bill Karbon, Director of Compliance for CBIZ Retirement Plan Services.

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